Author Topic: Pet hates when reading copy  (Read 18399 times)

Matt

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Re: Pet hates when reading copy
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2009, 08:08:53 AM »
Another thing. How about the weird passion for using the prefix 'pre'? An example from the BBC (of all people): "It was a pre-arranged attack." Why pre-arranged? Why not arranged? Why do people pre-book restaurants? In fact I can't undestand why every cook book under the sun tells you to pre-heat your oven when it could just say heat your oven. Why do I have to eat pre-packed sandwiches when I'd prefer to eat packed sandwiches? Anway, got to dash now. I've pre-organised a phone interview and I have to pre-prepare.

Matt

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Re: Pet hates when reading copy
« Reply #31 on: April 16, 2009, 07:46:06 AM »
and another one. The spread of the word "newest" riles me. It sounds odd, looks odd and is nowhere near as good as "latest".

miketown

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Re: Pet hates when reading copy
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2012, 11:31:36 PM »
My dad has been a journo for 50 years and a tutor for 20.  I've been taking his fact sheets and advice to student and compiling them.  Here's a list of words that people frequently get wrong.

http://simontownsendjournalism.com/words/wrong-words-make-you-look-silly/

ZoeRPM

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Re: Pet hates when reading copy
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2013, 04:42:42 PM »
1. Incorrect use of the word 'impact' especially as a verb.
2. Missing out the object of a transitive verb, as if the reader or listener won't miss it.
3. Switching from singular to plural half way through a sentence, especially the use of the word 'they' instead of 'he'.
4. Not being able to distinguish between a verb, a noun and a gerund, especially when using reflexive verb. There is no verb in the English language that begins with 'self'.
5. Referring to married women by their husbands' surnames. Noboby would treat a man like that. If you don't know what a married woman's surname is then it is correct to refer to her by her husband's name in full, e.g. Mrs. John Smith. If she doesn't like it, tough!