Twitter is an incredibly powerful communications tool, with more than 500 million tweets sent every day.

But once you have mastered the basic platform, where can you go from there?

This hands-on half-day course, led by former BBC reporter Sue Llewellyn, offers plenty of tips and tricks for getting the most out of Twitter, with a focus on advanced search techniques, verification and monitoring.

Sue will also analyse how you are doing so far on Twitter, and offer a personalised programme for improvement.

This course is aimed at journalists, editors, writers, programme-makers, PRs and anyone who wants to learn how to use Twitter more effectively.

It is designed for experienced Twitter users and is not suitable for beginners.

What will the course cover?
  • How to use advanced Twitter search to find relevant people and interesting content
  • How to increase your followers and maximise engagement
  • How to find someone tweeting from a particular location, including geolocating eyewitnesses in breaking news situations
  • How to build and borrow great Twitter lists
  • How to use Tweetdeck to monitor tweets, plus a range of other useful Twitter tools
  • How to verify tweets and avoid getting caught out by hoaxers
What do I need to bring?
Delegates will need to bring a laptop, and of course have access to a Twitter account.

About Sue Llewellyn

Sue Llewellyn Sue is a former BBC journalist who spent 15 years in the TV newsroom as a producer and reporter.

Over the last five years she has delivered board-level digital strategy and social media training to the BBC, RTÉ News, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Immediate Media Group and many others.

Sue is also a regular speaker at conferences in the UK and Europe on how journalists and newsrooms use social media.

Find her on Twitter @suellewellyn.

Testimonials

"I'd heard that Sue Llewellyn gave exceptional Twitter training and it proved to be true. She has the curious mind and chatter of a journalist with a helpful dash of geek to see you through the tech bits."
Michael Greenwood, Trinity Mirror